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Our Kachina Dolls are from the same collection found in high-end galleries around the country.  All dolls are signed and numbered for authenticity. Buy here for less.  Fast Shipping! Your order will arrive within 3-5 days if in stock. 

Kachina Dolls History

Spirits of the Southwest

What are Kachina dolls? They were first used as a teaching tool and in religious ceremonies of the Hopi Indians. The Navajo, Zuni, Pueblo and Apache tribes also participated in the making and using of the dolls. Each doll represents a spirit that dictates that use.

Kachina dolls history starts in the Southwest United States where the Pueblo Indians live. They are carved from soft cottonwood root in human likeness standing a few inches to 20 inches tall. They are painted in bright colors and enhanced with feathers, fur, turquoise and other stones, and feathers.

According to Indian belief, Kachinas make rain and allow crops to grow in abundance. They are the source of the sun and the moon. Without them there would be no life on earth. During certain times of year kachina dolls are given as gifts to children and women. There are over 900 varieties of the doll each representing a different spirit.

The first outsiders to see a kachina were the Spanish explorers during the 16th century. The first doll to be sold to a non-Indian was in 1857, which was given to the National Museum.

Kachina dolls represent spirits that live in the mountains. The Pueblo Indians believe the kachinas are messengers that take their prayers to the gods. They believe that the kachinas taught the first people how to live on the earth. They taught them what to eat, how to dress, how to grow food from the earth and how to take care of the earth that gave them life. The word kachina means “life bringer” in the language of the Pueblo Indians. During certain times of year kachina dolls are given as gifts to children and women. There are over 900 varieties of the doll each representing a different spirit.

Any kachina dolls history would be remiss to not impart some of the ceremony related to them. During the spring and summer the kachina come down from the mountain. Villagers dress as kachinas and dance in the plaza of the village in order to ensure health of the community, good harvests, fertility and celebrating life. Villagers are invited to dance with the kachina and today even outsiders are able to dance during public ceremonies. Winter and Spring solstice are some of the largest ceremonies that involve kachinas, but also the corn ceremony and the apex is the Home ceremony in the fall when the kachina go back to their homes in the mountains.

What are Kachina dolls? They are a representation of good and of evil, they answer prayers of the people and enhance life. They are representations of the Pueblo's beloved spirits.

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